The Joropo in Venezuela’s Musical Modernity: Cultural Capital in José Clemente Laya’s Sonata Venezolana

  • Ludim Rebeca Pedroza Texas State University
Keywords: Joropo, Sonata, Laya, analysis, Venezuela, nationalism

Abstract

The Venezuelan Escuela Nacional Moderna (1930s–40s) considered the joropo folk dance an inherently rich musical expression that demanded the spotlight of artistic autonomy. José Clemente Laya’s Sonata venezolana (1946) demonstrates how these composers transformed the framework of sonata form with the joropo’s musical presence.

Author Biography

Ludim Rebeca Pedroza, Texas State University

Ludim Rebeca PEDROZA (ludimpedroza@txstate.edu) is Assistant Professor of Music at Texas State University, where she teaches music history, piano techniques, and several graduate surveys of the music of Latin America. Her research focuses on the historical-aesthetic formation of ideologies of music, and the junction(s) between academic and popular musical cultures.

Published
2016-06-27
How to Cite
Rebeca Pedroza, L. (2016). The Joropo in Venezuela’s Musical Modernity: Cultural Capital in José Clemente Laya’s Sonata Venezolana. Musicological Annual, 52(1), 51-72. https://doi.org/10.4312/mz.52.1.51-72
Section
Articles