Reconstructing late Neolithic plant economies at the Eastern Adriatic site of Velištak (5th millennium cal BC)

  • Kelly Reed University of Warwick
  • Emil Podrug Šibenik City Museum
Keywords: charred macro-remains, cereal cultivation, archaeobotany, Croatia

Abstract

The archaeobotanical remains from Velištak are the first evidence of plant economies from an open-air settlement dating to the late Neolithic Hvar culture in Croatia (c. 4900–4000 cal BC). The results presented here are from the 2007–2013 field seasons. Based on an examination of carbonised macro-remains, it is suggested that emmer, einkorn, and barley were the main crops at Velištak, along with lentils, bitter vetch, and possibly peas and flax. Wild plants were also exploited, with evidence of wild fruits, such as cornelian cherry. Similarities with archaeobotanical finds from the early/middle Neolithic (c. 6000–4900 cal BC) also suggest that plant economies remained relatively unchanged during the Neolithic.

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Author Biographies

Kelly Reed, University of Warwick

School of Life Sciences

Teaching Fellow

Emil Podrug, Šibenik City Museum
Senior curator
Published
2016-12-30
How to Cite
ReedK., & PodrugE. (2016). Reconstructing late Neolithic plant economies at the Eastern Adriatic site of Velištak (5th millennium cal BC). Documenta Praehistorica, 43, 399-412. https://doi.org/10.4312/dp.43.19
Section
Articles