Monte d’Accoddi and the end of the Neolithic in Sardinia (Italy)

  • Maria Grazia Melis
Keywords: Monte d’Accoddi and the end of the Neolithic in Sardinia (Italy)– Sardinia, Neolithic, Eneolithic, chronology, sanctuary

Abstract

The Prenuragic shrine of Monte d’Accoddi is probably the most comprehensive representation of prehistory in Sardinia, both because it was continuously frequented from the Middle Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age, and because it contains the most significant elements of tradition and innovation during the passage from the Neolithic to the Eneolithic. Previous studies have defined Monte d’Accoddi as an altar, a ziggurat, a temple, or a step pyramid, and a wide debate has been generated about its hypothetical genetic relationship, reconstructive hypothesis, and significance. This paper does not analyse the above issues, but draws attention to other controversial problems, such as chronology or less studied aspects such as crafts. New radiocarbon dating from sites in the South of Sardinia and recent data that has been published about craft production relating to the shrine allow us to date the building of the first monument (4000–3650 calBC) to the Ozieri facies, with the second shrine dating to the Sub Ozieri (3500–3000 calBC) facies.

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Published
2011-12-31
How to Cite
Melis, M. G. (2011). Monte d’Accoddi and the end of the Neolithic in Sardinia (Italy). Documenta Praehistorica, 38, 207-220. https://doi.org/10.4312/dp.38.16
Section
Articles