The transfer of symbols and meanings: the case of the ‘horns of consecration’

  • Marina Milićević Bradač Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Zagreb
Keywords: horns of consecration, bulls’ heads, bucrania, representations of bucrania

Abstract

Sir Arthur Evans first used the term “horns of consecration” in 1901. Since then they have been interpreted in various ways as Moon idols (Mondidole), boat models, pot stands, loom stands, spit supports, and fire supports. Most, however, can be seen as abstracted bull’s horns. Abstraction should have taken place in Anatolia or northern Mesopotamia, and “horns of consecration” spread very early, appearing, as already defined symbols in various cultural settings. The question is whether they stood for the same set of ideas wherever they appeared, or if meaning varied from one cultural setting to another.

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Published
2005-12-31
How to Cite
Milićević Bradač, M. (2005). The transfer of symbols and meanings: the case of the ‘horns of consecration’. Documenta Praehistorica, 32, 187-196. https://doi.org/10.4312/dp.32.14
Section
Articles