The Development of Early Pottery in the Forest Zone of the Middle Volga Region (Eastern Europe)

Authors

  • Alexander Vybornov Samara State University of Social Sciences and Education, Russia
  • Konstantin Andreev Samara State University of Social Sciences and Education, Russia
  • Aleksandr Kudashov Samara State University of Social Sciences and Education, Russia
  • Marianna Kulkova Herzen State University, St. Petersburg, Russia https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9946-8751

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.4312/dp.48.19

Keywords:

Neolithic, Middle Volga region, earliest pottery, pottery technology, domestication, chronology

Abstract

The article is devoted to the Neolithisation in the forest zone of the Middle Volga River basin. The different conceptions of the process are considered. The archaeological materials from different sites located on this territory and neighbouring regions have been compared. The question was raised regarding animal domestication and its attributes in the forest zone of the Volga region in the Neolithic period. The hypothesis that pottery spread in the forest zone of the Middle Volga region under the influence of cultures from a forest-steppe zone of the Volga region was examined, and the chronological frame of this process was determined. However, the process has been essentially one of migration and was not autochthonous. The mobile lifestyle of early Neolithic hunters played a major part in their movements and did not connect with a productive economy (i.e. domestication). An indicator of these changes is pottery style. For the forest zone of the Middle Volga region, the earliest Neolithic vessels are characterized by rare ornamental patterns that appeared earlier than other types.

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Published

25.10.2021 — Updated on 24.11.2021

How to Cite

Vybornov, A., Andreev, K., Kudashov, A., & Kulkova, M. (2021). The Development of Early Pottery in the Forest Zone of the Middle Volga Region (Eastern Europe). Documenta Praehistorica, 48, 70–81. https://doi.org/10.4312/dp.48.19

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Articles