Unsettling the Binarisms of Dominant Discourse in Hanay Geiogamah’s Plays Body Indian and Foghorn

Authors

  • Danica Čerče University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Arts, Slovenia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.4312/an.53.1-2.5-20

Keywords:

Native American playwriting, Hanay Geiogamah, Body Indian, Foghorn, destabilising whiteness

Abstract

This essay deals with two plays by the contemporary Native American author Hanay Geiogamah, Body Indian and Foghorn. Based on the premise that literature plays an important role in disrupting the exercise of power and written against the backdrop of critical whiteness studies, it investigates how the playwright intervenes in the assumptions about whiteness as a static privilege-granting category and system of dominance.

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Published

26.11.2020

How to Cite

Čerče, D. (2020). Unsettling the Binarisms of Dominant Discourse in Hanay Geiogamah’s Plays Body Indian and Foghorn. Acta Neophilologica, 53(1-2), 5–20. https://doi.org/10.4312/an.53.1-2.5-20

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